5 Reasons To Collect Guitars

Have you ever met someone who doesn’t understand why you’d want to build a guitar collection? Show them this list to change their mind.

The guitar collecting community has seen many great strides during the past two decades. The prices of vintage guitars have risen and fallen rapidly as enthusiasts chase the best deals, and once aspiring musicians have taken to the hobby to remain a part of the music industry. Building a guitar collection can require an unrivaled amount of time and energy, but collectors won’t hesitate to tell you why the payoff is always worth it. Below are 5 reasons guitar collectors always want just one more guitar.


1: You’re interested in fine art, but are still budget conscious.

When you think about it, guitars occupy a totally unique space in modern culture. Rare and vintage guitars are considered “works of art” in museums across the country, but they can still be obtained by people who don’t have millions of dollars to their name.

Antique guitars can realistically be obtained for $5,000 or less with enough patience and research. While that is a lot of money, it pales in comparison to exquisite works of art that can easily be valued in excess of $10,000. Even compared to other vintage instruments like violins, guitars still prevail as the cheaper alternative.


2: You desire a unique collection.

Unless you’re secretly Jimmy Page, your guitar collection may realistically include only 6 or 7 instruments if you’re lucky. It may be a bummer to realize you can’t feasibly own every guitar out there, but conversely this means no two guitar collections will be the same.

By specializing in specific brands or eras of guitars, collectors have the opportunity to build original collections that friends and family members will see nowhere else. Also, because of the passion required to collect guitars, even a display of 3 or 4 guitars will seem impressive!


3: Guitars are usable collectibles.

Let’s be frank, the coolest part of owning a guitar collection is knowing you have all those guitars to actually use!

While other collectibles may only retain their value if kept in mint condition, fellow guitar collectors will expect even rare guitars to have been played regularly. While we wouldn’t tell an aspiring collector to smash their instruments like they’re Pete Townshend, they can still play and enjoy their collection without any reservations.


4: Vintage guitars might bring in the money.

Collecting strictly as an investment is always risky business, but savvy guitar players can stand to make a lot of money with a bit of wisdom and intuition.

As we said at the top of the list, the price of vintage guitars has fluctuated greatly in the past two decades. Not all guitars will increase in value over time, but those that do stand to sell for thousands more than they were originally worth. The ideal approach to investing in guitars is this: In a best case scenario, you might make a lot of money, but in a worse case scenario, you’ll have an array of great guitars you can always appreciate.


5: The opportunity to become part of music history inspires you.

Every guitar has played some role in history, no matter how small it is. From Jimi Hendrix’s iconic Stratocaster to the ongoing legacy of Lester Polsfuss’ “Les Pauls,” all guitars are informed by the instruments and the legendary musicians that came before them.

If we’re being completely honest with ourselves, not all of us are going to become stars in the industry like Eddie Van Halen or Eric Clapton. However, that doesn’t mean we can’t connect ourselves with the guitarists who have inspired us. Guitars – either intentionally or unintentionally – are the link between ourselves and pivotal moments in rock history. They’re the one thing all musicians have in common, regardless of their aptitude with the instrument. Having passion for these instruments that have created so much beautiful music throughout the years is not only reasonable by all accounts, but perhaps the best way to respect such an important part of our culture.

It doesn’t matter if a guitar is worth $300 or $300,000; it’s the bond you share with it that makes it priceless.