Collector Spotlight: Goobber1130

For a collection that’s as eclectic as it is exquisite, look no further than Goobber1130’s Gemr page. In addition to his wide array of comic books, Goobber1130 is also a collector of stamps, books, vinyl records, and more. Yet despite this variety of items, each of his collectibles are carefully photographed and are accompanied by concise descriptions and stories. To see why we’ve chosen him as our newest Featured Collector for yourself, check out his 350+ item collection by clicking here.

1: How did you first begin collecting?



I think the first time I intentionally started collecting was in middle school (circa early 1990’s). My best friend and his father collected comics, and after seeing their collection I was instantly hooked. They brought me into the fold and we would go to local conventions and shops to purchase comics.

2: What do you look for in a collectible?



image03 I like to collect things that make me happy and I collect things that are unique. One of my largest collections is of small-press/mini comics. These are comics that have largely been created by young artists trying to break into the comics industry. They’re xeroxed copies or printed from home, and to save money on paper, the comics are usually small. These comics are also regional to the artist’s location, so you’ll rarely find a mini comic from an artist based in Erie, Pennsylvania in a comic shop in Austin, Texas.I also like to collect comics that have good intentions but miss the mark. It’s an obscure theme to build a collection around, but it’s been loads of fun finding comics that make you think, “Huh? What were they thinking?”, By and large it’s actually a reflection on the times the comic was produced in, but sometimes there are comics that just don’t handle the story correctly. For example, check out Superman’s Girl Friend Lois Lane #106 or Dark Horse’s 1993 comic Godzilla vs. Barkley.

3: What do you think makes your collections unique?



I think everyone’s collection is unique by definition since it’s a reflection of our personalities and our obsessions. If you look at my collections on Gemr (which is only a small portion, I’m slowly adding more each week) you’ll notice that it’s varied from stamps to Harry Potter and from Comic books to vinyl records. These are items that are either a direct link to something I enjoy (Harry Potter book series), to someone special to me (my mother and I collected stamps when I was younger), or to a specific moment such as having my comics sketches and signed. When I look at some of my comics and graphic novels that have been signed I can recall the entire day: what I did before the signing, and the conversation I had with the artist, writer, or creator.

I also like having the things I collect signed and sketched on because it makes it more unique and personal.

4: What is it that makes collecting enjoyable to you?



I attribute emotions and memories to the items I collect. When I read my Harry Potter books or look through my collection, I think of the person who introduced me to the series as a way of connecting with them. Although I’m reading a book, I feel a connection to that person. There are a number of items in my collection that were gifts, so I think of friends and family who have taken interest in my collecting habits.

I also like to experience history through the items I collect. I like stamps and worn coins because they have a history behind them. I ponder about where they’ve been, who held these items, and possibly who will be the next person to possess the items in my collection.

5: What item of yours do you think has the most interesting story behind it?



image02 If I had to choose, it would be a pair of cufflinks that my father-in-law gifted me for Christmas. There’s no Indiana Jones-esque story behind this item, but I feel like it was a generous gesture on his part because they belonged to his father, Clare, who had passed the year before. My wife says he was a Freemason and would wear the cufflinks during the events he would attend there.

6: What is your process for photographing and displaying your items?



My process is extremely low-budget. I have a few pure-white poster boards that I’ve taped to a table to create a makeshift mini cyc-wall. I use a modeling light off to the side and I photograph with a Sony A99. I do a brief post-production process before posting the photos onto my Gemr account. I don’t spend too much time photographing my items because I want to get as many things up as possible since I have such a large collection.

I’ve seen some really creative photos on Gemr, and I hope that once I get everything I want uploaded, I can go back and take a stab at creating more provocative photos.

7: What is your favorite piece within your collections?



image00 I’m attached to so many items in my collection, but I would have to say it’s actually a comics anthology called Project: Romantic. In it is my favorite comic called Benches. It’s drawn and written by Liz Prince, an independent comic creator. The comic is a mere 4 pages/23 panels long, but it eloquently captures the complex notions of love, loss, and healing.

8: Where do you look for new items?



Well I like good deals, but I also support the local businesses where I live. So I purchase all my books through the local bookstore, Let’s Play Books. Yard sales are always fun to sift through, which usually leads to meeting other collectors. I also hit up Barnes & Noble when they have sales; from September through October they put out bargain bins, and each week the discounts get steeper. If you get there when the store opens you can pick up some great items for only a couple of dollars. I also purchase all of my comics from Midtown Comics in New York City.

9: What is your most valuable item worth?



I don’t collect as a means of investment so I’ve never seriously checked what any of my items are worth. I own a few Golden and Silver-age comics that may be worth a few hundred dollars, but nothing really comes to mind.

10: How do you think your personality comes through in your collections?



Just like what I collect, I have scattered interests and I think the variety in my collections illustrates that. For those who know me I’m the sort of person who has friends of all walks of life and I’m into everything from binge-watching horror b-films to going on hikes with my kids and teaching them about plants and insects.

11: If you could add any one piece to your collection what would it be?



Collecting for me is sort of like the hunt for the Holy Grail, it’s a never-ending quest for the unattainable. I’m not sure what would be the one piece I would add to my collection, but I know that once I obtain it something else will come along for me to chase.