Monster Hunter: Generations Ultimate Header

I’m taking credit for the Monster Hunter: Generations Ultimate localization.


My fellow Gemr-icans: I shall gracefully accept your thanks for making the English Monster Hunter: Generations Ultimate release a reality.

About three weeks ago, I wrote a blog about the 10 Japan only games that should have come west. For those who missed this critical piece of journalism, I listed 10 games that I felt would have been major hits had they been localized into English. One of these games was Monster Hunter: Double Cross for the Nintendo Switch. Sure, this was just a juiced up version of Monster Hunter: Cross (Monster Hunter: Generations in English), but… come on. It’s Monster Hunter. It’s the Nintendo Switch. The two were made for each other.

Monster Hunter: Generations Ultimate Screenshot

Some may prefer Monster Hunter: World because it’s newer, but can I take my PS4 to a rooftop party and play it with my friends? Technically yes, but that’s massively inconvenient and not the point.

Anyway, we’re getting sidetracked here. The important detail is that Monster Hunter: Double Cross is finally getting a Western release as Monster Hunter: Generations Ultimate. Nearly a full year after it came out on the Switch in Japan.

Okay, so… let’s wrap back around to “How I personally made Monster Hunter: Generations Ultimate happen.” Notice how I’ve specifically called the game’s Japanese name “Monster Hunter: Double Cross,” as opposed to its technically correct stylization as “Monster Hunter: XX.” I did this because I, TimM, king of the slams, really wanted to write this joke in the original article:

Still, English Switch owners are without a Monster Hunter game on their system of choice. Looks like Capcom really double crossed us, if you catch my drift.”

My running theory is that this joke, with its superb wit and impeccable subtly, literally sent everyone at Capcom into an irrevocable frenzy. I hurt them so bad that they went back in time, announced Mega Man 11, and will abruptly cancel it before release just to get back at me. Since even that could not match the damage I’ve done to their psyche, they are now acquiescing and are translating Generations Ultimate into English to make my original article look foolish. You know, just another day in the office for a hard hitting journalist like myself.

Monster Hunter: Generations Ultimate Screenshot 2

I know what you’re thinking: First, probably “are we going to gloss over the fact that Capcom is capable of time travel?” And second, “Do you really think Capcom could really greenlight and announce a localization like this in the course of three weeks?” To answer the second question, here is my counterpoint:

Shhhhhhh.

Oh, and another cool feature of Monster Hunter: Generations Ultimate is how you can carry over your save files from the imported Japanese version and the original Generations for 3DS. What? This is a blog about important Monster Hunter: Generations Ultimate facts. Don’t give me that face.

Monster Hunter Bloodbath Diablos

For real though, the reason why I included the Switch Monster Hunter game in my original list is because fans have been dying for this one. I could hardly spend a day in the larger Nintendo Switch community without seeing Monster Hunter mentioned at least once. It would be foolish for Capcom to pass on this opportunity, and I’m glad they agree with us. In fact, with the ridiculous success of Monster Hunter: World, Monster Hunter: Generations Ultimate might be in an even better spot now to generate buzz. If you’ve been passionate about this game for the past year, give yourself a pat on the back. You made this localization happen, and soon it’ll be time for us to finally enjoy the heck out of this game.

Also for real though, if E3 comes around and we see English versions of Seiken Densetsu 3 and/or Mother 3, I’m going to write nothing but articles asking for cool Japanese games to get released in English.

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Written by TimM
Tim is a video game aficionado who is fascinated by pop culture. He built his first collection in 1999 by catching all 151 monsters in Pokemon Red, and he hasn't stopped collecting since. His work has been featured multiple times on Destructoid.com.